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Harringay, Haringey - So Good they Spelt it Twice!

Large weed like climber plant growing into my garden from Harringay land. What should I do?

Since viewing my garden in the day light I noticed a huge growth of green leaves climbing

over a tree/large bush and other parts of my back fence that were not there just two or three months ago.

The land behind my garden belongs to the council and this is where the massive green weed is

coming from. It's just a vacant piece of land that the council keeps mowed but it's enclosed and not really used.

I have been trying to track down someone in the council to deal with this plant but can not find anyone

that seems to be responsible. The plant is growing like crazy and I'm concerned it might be something

undesirable. Does anyone know who can help me and what I should do about the plant? I am unable to

reach the weed/plant myself. Any advice gratefully received.

Tags for Forum Posts: ., Harringay, land., unused, weed

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Perhaps you could take a photo and post so we can identify the plant involved.

'Pray' it's not Japanese Knotweed - Google this to, hopefully, rule it out. Good luck and fingers crossed! 

Many officers who had local knowledge have sadly taken voluntary redundancies, after being made to apply for their job three times in six years. As a result staff are covering jobs with less staff and local knowledge, once a great asset that saved time.

Do you have any photos ? HoL does have it’s experts, a site visit would establish the context, and identify whether the plant is noxious. Feel free to message me on Harringay Online, I’m  a returning candidate for the council elections, and I can follow up on it. I have seen instances in Harringay, where a noxious plant has been removed and not disposed of properly, and discussed it with a council officer from two separate deperments. But first it needs identification.

It sounds like bindweed not knotweed

Since it appears to have been growing during the past 2-3 (winter) months then it could be ivy, which is evergreen and grows when other climbers don't. Japanese knotweed isn't a climber thank goodness and dies back each autumn. Bindweed/convolvulus too dies back.

If it is ivy you could try a systemic weed killer, one you paint on to the leaves.  The toxin is carried do to the roots.  Takes a bit of persistence though   Homebase sells one that it claims specifically targets ivy

https://www.homebase.co.uk/roundup-tough-gel-weedkiller-150ml_p410341

However, if it is ivy you can manage it by pruning as it provides a great haven, and food, for wildlife.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/earth/story/20141008-why-should-i-love-ivy

No need to kill ivy with poison, it's not that invasive and you can cut it back or pull it up! When Haringey insisted on replacing the fence at the back of my garden a few years ago, they ripped out all the ivy growing on it and we lost the thrushes' nest that had been there for years.

Virginia creeper can be a bit persistent in it's reach but quite easy to pull out.

Hi Mandy

Please get in touch with me so I can chase this up with the relevant officers. I would need to know your address and the location of the adjacent land.

My email is zena.brabazon@haringey.gov.uk

Phone number: 07812 677710

Best wishes

Zena

Zena Brabazon

Cllr, Harringay Ward

Zena

It’s true a little hand on value goes a long way, and an environmental touch is needed. Contractors don’t have a focus on this direction, if there is a concern for wildlife it should be addressed.

Sorry to hear of your ideal. Broom Rape is an interesting way of keeping Ivy at bay, it’s a parasitic plant that feeds off the Ivy, and produces an annual flower. We show the children about intervention & coexistence at Railway Fields.

Gordon, That does sound reassuring.

Knotweed seems more like a direct shoot, and it does die back, from what I’ve seen on the New River.

Perhaps the council could do something to make residents aware of Knotweed, (as a highly noxious plant,) the best course of action, and potential disposal, to mitigate its spread.

Thank you so much everyone for taking the time to reply, I really appreciate it.

I will be following up some of your ideas.

Its definitely not ivy though. That's at the bottom of the picture attached and has been on my back fence for

years. It's the stuff above, growing over my elderflower tree. The leaves are light green.

Attachments:

The leaves in the top right on top of the shed look like bind weed which grows by climbing up other plants. It's one of the most difficult weeds to eradicate because its roots are deep and the plant will regrow from the slightest bit of root left in the ground. Round up weed killer works but, if you wish to avoid killing the supporting plant, the individual bind weed strands have to be unwound before they are sprayed.

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