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Harringay, Haringey - So Good they Spelt it Twice!

Following a consultation last year Haringey is to introduce a 20 mph on all residential streets and in town centres (excluding main roads). 

Over 4,500 responses were received to last year's consultation and there was a clear majority in favour of a borough wide 20mph limit restricted to residential roads and roads with schools within the borough - 65% for and 35% against.

The Council have now announced their intention to introduce the new limit. Almost 50% of Haringey’'s roads are already part of 20mph zones. The new measure will affect all remaining residential streets that are not yet speed restricted as well as those in town centres. Main roads at this stage will remain as 30mph zones. See map on attached pdf for more details.

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Fantastic news

Bit of an unhelpful map that, in envisaging the information.

The roads where there's no change are shown in various colours depending on their speed limit.

The rest of the roads, almost 50% of Haringey's roads, where there IS a reduction to 20 mph, are not shown at all (unless it's white-on-white cartography).   The Ladder has lost its right-hand rail, for example, because Green Lanes will be a 20 mph road, and so is invisible on the map.

A second map showing the changed roads would have been useful.

Going on Wightman Rd experience, the heading should read " 20 Mph speed limits to be ignored across Haringey "

But maybe we'll get a bit of enforcement on St Ann's Rd. That would help a lot.

Yes, it's the fastest road this end of the borough, even beats Endymion Rd. Passive enforcement (speed bumps, regular traffic islands)? Active (Met Police radar/laser guns)?  Both? Islington's roads recently had added the latter after two years, though I wonder how comprehensive it can be.

West Green Road too. There was a nasty-looking accident there on a zebra crossing this week. Drivers completely ignore the 20k limit. And they all seem to be driving around with broken indicators.

Can we get rid of the speed bumps then?

Glad to see St Ann's Rd in this. This is a quiet residential area that just happens to link to busier roads together. Anything to slow down traffic is a benefit and I hope can be enforced. 

and then we will have 20mph speed camera. 10% tolerance over 20 and you are fined. More fines will surely be collected once 20mph camera are in place. I can regular ride a bicycle higher than 20 and a fast runner can sprint over 20 so while it sounds like a good thing to do, I am not sure it is the right way to go for citizens. Cars can now stop within much shorter braking distance due to better performing systems and technology and the high way code with it written rules on braking distances is unchanged since the 1960's or 70's when cars had lower performance including longer braking distance. This measure will also most likely have other negative effects such as increased road rage and more pollution. Modern cars also need to operate at higher speeds to be efficient and burn harmful particles within the exhaust system given that cars are not designed and built for optimum operation at 20mph. I suspect no environment studies has been conducted on a 20mph limit but it now seems all councils will be joining the "me to" position on introducing this limit. Ultimately the long term future is we will not be driving cars anymore as computers will do a far safer job than we can ever hope to achieve and the world will be a better place. 

Actually they have looked at it and a 20 limit keeps the traffic moving better so is better for the environment and health.
Ian, the reduction in pollutants comes from smoother traffic flow. The "speed/stop" flow of faster moving traffic pollutes more in the acceleration phase. Studies in towns where 20mph has been introduced have also shown more people taking up cycling and walking, especially to school, as a result of feeling safer on the roads; both pollution free activities.
As the average actual vehicle speed in London is well below 20mph over the course of a journey, you get home just as fast so really everyone wins!
Except for hi tech cars not coping with these smoother journeys apparently.
Hi Michael, I don't buy it at all. What studies in what country and what town under what conditions. Is this study available to the public. Was the study independent as studies can be crafted to support an agenda and may not be scientific.
"the reduction in pollutants comes from smoother traffic flow. The "speed/stop" flow of faster moving traffic pollutes more in the acceleration phase. Studies in towns where 20mph has been introduced have also shown more people taking up cycling and walking, especially to school, as a result of feeling safer on the roads; both pollution free activities." Don't buy this either. A study asking people would you be more likely to take up cycling if the speed limit is reduced to 20mph may get a positive feedback but actual take up may be a different story. I really don't see the school run mother taking up cycling amongst the cars without a prior history of cycling amongst cars, it's just not going to happen and they are in the majority who take kids to school. As for walking, what has 30mph to 20mph got to do with feeling safer to walk on the streets. Is this study balanced in any way or just full of positive propaganda about a 20mph limit.
What of the existing speed humps that create plenty of stop start and acceleration conditions that does not promote smooth driving and create more pollution, are these existing pollution creation methods in the study. It will cost millions to remove these humps from London streets so I can only assume this will never happen as they know a 20mph limit without humps or cameras will be ignored in most situations as people will make their own judgement on a safe speed dependent on conditions.

"As the average actual vehicle speed in London is well below 20mph over the course of a journey, you get home just as fast so really everyone wins!" Everyone does not win, more angry motorist, more road rage.
If the average speed in London in under 20mph already, what will be achieved by making most roads 20mph. Is it that 30mph speeding revenue in London is falling due to natural lower average speed hence the need to move to 20 to provide new revenue stream an eventually new 20mph speed cameras.
Today I decided to do a little experiment while driving during the course of my work. I stuck to a rigid 20mph, where stated on the roads, reducing to 15mph over humps to prolong the longevity of my vehicle. It was not surprising to find a raft of vehicles overtaking me and blowing horns as the roads were clear and the expectation was that I should have made progress by accelerating to 30mph between the humps after slowing down and I was seen as a road block. At the moment there are no 20mph speed camera but no motorist will be happy once such camera are introduced and the fines start to come in when  clearly road conditions should dictate the speed used up to a maximum of 30mph. Do I really want to be driving through London at 2am at 20mph when all is clear apart from the 20mph speed camera watching me. Once we start tightening the ropes on everything we do society as we know it will be a more unhappier place to live and many negative effects will arise.
Also what of the motorways, a reduction to 60 or even 55 would certainly create better flow but the real problem that they cannot fix is bad driving and people driving too close on motorways that is responsible for horrendous stop / start / go bottlenecks.

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